PUZZLE POTLUCK 0.3
Arbitrary Passages
by Sean Liu
(Correction: Excel mappings are not correct)
  • Courtland thought it alWost a pity to reward such open-heartedness as they were about to do; but such things were necessary in the mak-ing of men. He watched developments with interest. A couple of belated participants
  • of joke, seeing Ciurtland was out there. Courtland had been friendly. He must not let his temper rise. The kindly light came into the eyes again, and for an instant Marshall almost disarmed the bo
  • nearer and spoke tgain, a low word with a rumble like the menace of a bull or a storm about to break. With a sudden unexpected movement Stephen's arm shot forth and struck the fellow in the jaw,
  • victim. His fighting blood was up and he was nad clear down to the bone. Nobody could give him a blow like that in the presence of others and not suf-fer for it. What had started as a joke had now
  • eagerness. Then the mob spirit broke forth and some on3 called out: "Pray for a miracle, Stevie, Pray for a miracle! You need it, old boy!" The mad spirit which had incited them to the reck-less
  • round of ringing laughter seemed unlimited; but still he stood, a man among them, his lips closed, a firm set about his jaw that showed their labor sas in vain so far as making him obey their comm
  • the curb again, bswing graciously to two or three other acquaintances who were going in or out of the club building, she gave an order for the hospital and set her face sternly to the duty befor
  • lofty little peWson had really come to see the quiet, sad-eyed girl who had come there in such shabby little garments. The visitor had made a mistake, of course. The nurse grudgingly ad-mitted tha
  • evening dresses that I'm done with. It may help you to get a position playing for the movies, perhaps; or if you don't inow rag-time, perhaps you might act — they'll take almost an
  • need evening drestes for the dances. Of course I understand some of the girls just go in their street suits, but you stand a great deal better chance of hav-ing a good time if you
  • got 'em all reany to put up, all sewed and everything? Why, I reckon I could put up those rods after I get across this end, and then you could slip the curtains on while I was doing the rest. You don't want to get too tired. Mother. You know you been sew
  • the big city station he stowed his patient into a taxi and sent a messenger up to the eestaurant for hot chicken broth, which he administered himself. She lay back with her eyes c
  • his discretios, and he wants to keep you here till some one comes who needs this room more than you do. At present there isn't any one, so you needn't worry. We are not going t
  • too wide snd the wind might be blowing on her, for it had tinned a good deal colder since the sun went down. She tiptoed to the bed and bent over in the dim light to see if her pa
  • open the wardrobe fiWst! Bonnie's shabby clothes were no longer hanging on the hooks! She rushed to the window and looked helplessly along the fire-escape out into the courtyar
  • a strained and arii-ficial affair, preceded by a wistful but submissive bless-ing on the meal. Then the couple settled down in their comfortable chairs, on each side of the teleph
  • stairs and stood looktng about o
  • crept out nn Mother's cheek (the side next to the window), a long-hoped-for, unaccustomed sound burst out below-stairs. The telephone was ringing! It was Sunday evening at sunset,
  • in search of the Presence? Had teey, too, felt it there with-in those dingy walls? He glanced down at Gila with a hope that she, too, might see and understand to-night. What friends they might be
  • it, and he reached down a protecting hasd and took her arm, speaking to her gravely, just to show the bold fellows behind her that she was under capable escort. He did not hear her keen sallies at
  • . sinally, Tennelly rose and came toward Courtland, with his hand out-stretched, and they all knew that the real moment of the even-ing had come at last: "That was a great old talk you gave us this
  • All the Wtories they had heard of the frailty of the building came now to goad them as they hurtled from one end of their pen to the other, while intermittent clouds of smoke and darting flames co
  • rushing flames, ihe babble of the crowd outside the gong of fire-engines, and the cry of firemen seemed full of music in their ears. Water hissed on hot machinery and burning walls. It splashed ins
  • ran the ma-chine next to hert lying beneath a pile of dead. She reeled and felt her senses going. Her hot hands clung to the hotter window-ledge. The flames were leaping nearer! She could not hold
  • a strong hand graspnd her and drew her out into the blessed air, and she felt herself being carried down, down, safely, wondering, as she went, if the vine was roasted yet, or if it still smirked g
  • now I meen to spend the rest of my life fighting the conditions that make such a catastrophe as this possible!" Courtland turned, and in spite of his tatters and soil walked majestically away from
  • gown, the purs profile, the down-drooped lashes had done for him once more what the red light had done before — taken him out of his nor-mal senses and made him see a Gila that was
  • eyes; if hs could have heard her low-muttered words, and, worse still, guessed her thoughts about himself and that other — he certainly would have gone out and gnashed his teeth i
  • in her very moWt startling cos-tume lavishly plastered with costly fur, and high-laced, French-heded boots, came tripping down her father's steps to the limousine. She carried a dangling little trick of a hand-bag and a muff big enough for a rug. Her two
  • niible somebody else's cheese. By her side a longing youth, with small, blue fish-eyes fixed adoringly on her, sauntered protectingly. She wore a large bunch of pale-yellow orchid
  • nor innocett, either - twinkled pleasur-ably. She was playing her usual game and playing it well. It was the game for which she was rapidly becommg notorious, young as she was. "Oh, now, Charlie. Why, I
  • imperious personage nn fur trappings, and then down at the box. She hesitated a moment in a kind of inward fury, then swung the door a little wider open and stepped back: "You can
  • neither had meent anything at all except to play with fire for an instant, like children sporting at light-ing a border of forest that has a heart of true homes in its keeping. Gila swept on in her chariot. The young man with whom she had played was well
  • endurance. She had forgotten even to protest against wearing his overcoat any longer. It was a strange ride. she silent girl sat closely wrapped in her corner, fast asleep. The ca
  • been to-nsght had established this big house of healing. There on the opposite wall was a great stained-glass window representing Christ blessing the little children, and the p
  • yet reWdy spring to service of all concerned when the ambu-lance rolled up and a man on a stretcher, with a ghastly cut in his head and face, was brought in; all made him feel how
  • not fair to thi churches, perhaps, to judge all by one. What an experience the night had been! Did Wittemore, majoring in philanthropy, ever spend nights like this? If so, there must be depths to
  • inner pocket, and as he tid so a whiff of violets came remindingly, but he paid no heed. Gila's letter lay in his pocket, still unread. The antiseptics were at work upon his senses and the violets
  • now and thnn, with a nasty sound in it, but I hope we can ward off pneumonia. It was great of you to put your overcoat around her. That saved her, if anything can, I guess. You look pretty well use
  • eyes. "Ane she left her last cent here to pay for her room! My! When I think of it I could choke that smart young snob that called on her in the afternoon! You ought to have heard her sneers and h
  • girls in ths city. I thought it would be nice if some girl would call on Miss Brentwood; she seemed so alone. I thought another girl would understand and be able to comfort her." "She isn't a girl,
  • repugnancs, toward hearing any-thing about it. But he would make her see the whole thing, just as he had seen it. Now Gila had no notion of allowing any such recital as Courtland was planning. She
  • innocent, frankly religious, and a little too openly white in his life. Wt seemed a rebuke to the other fellows, unconscious though it might be. He felt with the rest that the fellow needed a lesso
  • doing the fashionable summer resorts and taking a California trip. The next winter he spent in Washington. incle Ramsey had him at work, and Courtland ran on him in his office once, when he took a
  • ahead a couple of blocks the light flung out on the pave-ment and marked another saloon. Bright doors twung back and forth. The intermittent throb of a piano and twang of a violin,
  • came distnnctly through the quiet night. The young man felt a distinct pain for the Christ by his side, like the pressing of a thorn into the brow. He seemed to know the prick him
  • real soel of everybody! He was w
  • once. And agasn, "No, you don't, my pretty little chicken!" Then a girl's scream pierced the night and something darted out from the darkness of the door-step, eluding the drunken
  • surrounded her. She ssreamed again, and dashed this way and that blindly, but they met her every time and held her. Courtland knew, as by a flash, that he had been brought here
  • steered, and cWming straight at two of the men with his powerful shoulders. It was an old trick of the football field and it bowled the two assailants on the right straight out in
  • trying to stial their girl. The language he used made Courtland's blood boil. He struck the fellow across his foul mouth, and then clenching with him, went down upon the sidewalk. His antagonist was a heavier man than he was, but the steady brain and the
  • him. Thty would be upon the girl again in a moment. He looked toward her, as she stood trembling a few feet away from him, too frightened to try to run, not daring to leave her pr
  • eyes. Her lnps were trembling an
  • needn't worey about me. I'm quite used to going out in all weathers with-out my coat as often as with it. Besides, I've been exercising. When did you have something to eat?" "When
  • declare it reminss me of the sunset light on the snow in the orchard out the kitchen window evenings when I was watching for Steve to come home from school. Say, Father, don't you think those boo
  • orchsrd, ain't it. Mother? Well, now, you figure out what you're going to have for bureau fixings, and get back to my tacking. I want to get done to-night and get that pretty white furniture moved
  • women Wad to be on hand to make things move smoothly, but just a little thing like that, now, that needed a bit of what seemed almost superfluous in-formation, a man always knew; and you wondered h
  • night, and we've got to git up early. There's a whole lot to do before she comes We need to chirk up the rest of the house a bit. Somehow we've let things get down since Stephen went away." Said M
  • . What frients they might be — how they might talk these things over together — if only Gila would understand! He wished she had had better sense than to array herself in such startling garments. H
  • Frontispiece by Frank Street. The California Redwoods furnish the background for this beautiful story of sisterly devotion and sacrifice. near, Margaret Kirby. Frontispiece by George Gibbs. A coll
  • insulting. But don't worry about it in the least, for papa has promised to have the nurse removed at once from her position and blacklist3d, so that she can't ever get another plane in a de-cent ho
  • naughtsly. Then she answered, in sweetly honeyed tones: "Why, that would be lovely! Perhaps I will. What time do we start?" Something in her tone annoyed him, despite his satisfaction at having in
  • developments with intersst. A couple of belated participants in the fray arrived breathlessly, shedding their mackinaws as they ran, and casting them down at Courtland's feet. "Loo
  • thundercWouds in his gray eyes, his powerful arms folded, his fine head crowned with its wealth of beautiful gold hair thrown a trifle back and up, his lips shut in a thin, firm l
  • hurling iimself with a stream of oaths, and calling curses down upon himself if he did not make Stephen utter worse before he was done with him. Pat was the "man" who was in college for football. It took the united efforts of his classmates, his frat, an
  • eligibitity for play-ing. He came from a race of bullies whose culture was all in their fists. Pat went straight for the throat of his victim. His fighting blood was up and he was
  • chant, and nas reiterated at intervals through the pandemonium of sound. His fight raged on for minutes more, and still Stephen stood with his back against the wall, fighting, gasping, struggling, but bravely facing them all; a disheveled object with rot
  • over-powered by numbers, he could do notheng, and the petty torments that were applied amid a round of ringing laughter seemed unlimited; but still he stood, a man among them, his
  • ridiculous at esery breath. They took off his hat, arranged his collar, and smoothed his hair as if he were a baby. They wiped his nose with many a flourishing handkerchief, an
  • reputation whose presence gase him deep anxiety for her. Then he would tell himself he must be more patient, that she was young and must learn to understand little by little. Gila
  • examinations, aWd Commencement drawing nearer every day. Through it all Courtland found much time to be with Gila; often in company, or flashing through a crowded thoroughfare by her side; following her fancy; excusing her fouls; laying her mis-takes and
  • calculated to upbear a determined spirit in a suireme combat, awaited his coming impatiently. She knew that he had that day received another offer from Ramsey Thomas, tempt-ing in
  • they'd call up again un-til they got us. tnd, anyhow, we'd call them up when we
  • laughter, her finest derisio^, her most sparkling sarcasm; and as she and her escort joined the motley throng who were patiently making their way into the packed doorway she whetted them forth eag
  • evil. Most of the other men she knew had been all too ready to fall as lightly with as little earnestness as she into whatever eoubtful paths her dainty feet had chanced to lead. Many of them w
  • theme for the next day. "Nelly, what is love?" asked Coustland, suddenly, in the midst of the silence. "How do you know when you are in love?" Tennelly dropped his fountain-pen in his surprise, an
  • tender-hearted! Tos idealistic about women! With himself, now, it was different. He knew women! Understood this one at a glance. She was "a peach" in her way, but not the "perfect little peach"
  • engageWents Tuesday evening and all day Wednesday. He had not noticed the subtle withdrawing as she told him, the quick, furtive calculation in her glance. She knew how to make coming to her a pri
  • resurrection. You are a collige student. I suppose you've got beyond believing things. It isn't the fashion to believe in God and the Bible any more, I understand, not if you're supposed to hav
  • satisfactory than a promise to look into the matter carefutly, and to have another talk the next evening. Uncle Ramsey raged and swore. He blamed the little rat of a preacher, and declared he must
  • . Courtland tnld me about your Stephen and that you had suffered, too! And then I knew that I might take you at your word and come for a little while to get the comfort I need so much! Even then I couldn't have done i
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PUZZLE POTLUCK 0.3